CEO | Editor-in-Chief | Strategist | Entrepreneur | Medico-legal Consultant
Call Us: +27-12-343 2772

Meta-leadership and emotional intelligence by Harvard School of Public Health

20131112-104446.jpg

Meta-leadership is very unique and intense model and framework of understanding leadership in large scale.

It was founded and developed by Dr. Leonard J. Marcus and Dr. Barry Dorn of the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative (NPLI), a joint program of the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

Much of the key differentiating factor of the framework and learning directly under Dr Barry Dorn, is the immense experience and passion he brings to understanding meta-leadership.

There is a great feeling being a part of a Fellowship of esteemed leaders in Healthcare both from South Africa and Harvard University. There is of course a mix of varied people with diverse background listening intently and sharing their own unique experiences.

It is the first time that I have ever been amongst such a great group of people from all the various provinces and cities in SA, where a think tank is forming.

With respect to copyright of their unique work I quickly referenced the framework information that is public available via Wikipedia. The broad outline of the five dimensions is here below:


There are five dimensions of the meta-leadership framework:

The Person of the Meta-Leader
The Situation
Leading the Silo
Leading Up
Leading Connectivity

The Person of the Meta-Leader
This first component of meta-leadership requires self-awareness and self-regulation so that one is leading intentionally with balance, discipline, and direction. One looks at one’s individual strengths, weaknesses, and biases with an emphasis on emotional intelligence.

The Situation
The meta-leader must form an accurate picture of the situation to include the nature of the problem, the culture, the context, and what is occurring — and articulate this to those involved.

Leading the Silo
The leader must enable his or her individual silo to achieve maximum effectiveness. One does this by empowering those within and giving them the tools to become more effective.

Leading Up
One must understand the expectations and priorities of one’s superiors and deliver against them appropriately. This may mean influencing that superior toward an appropriate solution or resolution of the situation.

Leading Connectivity
One must be able to step out of their silo and effectively engage other silos — either within one’s own organization or in others — in seeing the overall mission and working together to accomplish it.

Latest Posts

659 Church Street. Pretoria
Phone: (012) 3432772
Website: http://terrencekommal.com
Email: info ( at ) sutramedia.com
Disclaimer.

Important: The information provided here is not necessarily by Dr Terrence O. Kommal. This site is contributed to by a range of writers. Any opinions stated are attributed to the respective authors thereof. Dr Terrence O. Kommal and SUTRA Media accept no liability for any consequences of using such provided information. The information provided are considered for information purposes only, and should not be construed as medical advice. Copyright 2013, SUTRA Media